Celebrating World Arabic Language Day

19th December 2017

The Arab-Irish Chamber of Commerce were lead sponsors at an event to celebrate the world Arabic language day.

 

The event was presented by Arabesque events with support from The Mission of the Palestinian State, the Embassies of the Kingdom of Morocco, The Arab Republic of Egypt, The Arab Republic of Sudan, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. 

The event was held in collaboration with the Welcome Café which is funded by the Department of Justice and Equality and Dublin City Council.

AICC Chairman Dr. Niall Holohan (1).jpg

AICC Chairman Dr. Niall Holohan 

This was the first ever celebration of the World Arabic Language Daly in Dublin.  The commemoration marks the fact that Arabic became one of the official languages at the United Nations, as well as a working language on 18th December 1973.  It was first established by UNESCO in 2010 and has since been observed annually on this date.

Councillor Paddy MacCartan.jpg

Councillor Paddy MacCartan

The evening of poetry and entertainment was held at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin Castle on 18th December.  The aim was to bring East and West together through sharing traditions and culture in an environment that will encourage the presenting of both traditions. Dublin based Palestinian musician Ruba Shamshoum performed with her band and Iraqi poet Majid Mujed read from his well know collection of poetry. 

Aicc chairman Dr. Holohan with Councillor Paddy MacCartan.jpg

Aicc chairman Dr. Holohan with Councillor Paddy MacCartan

AICC Chairman Dr. Niall Holohan was a keynote speaker on the night and read a poem by acclaimed Palestinian poet and author Mahmoud Darwish.

 

In Jerusalem

BY MAHMOUD DARWISH 

TRANSLATED BY FADY JOUDAH 

In Jerusalem, and I mean within the ancient walls,

I walk from one epoch to another without a memory

to guide me. The prophets over there are sharing 

the history of the holy ... ascending to heaven

and returning less discouraged and melancholy, because love

and peace are holy and are coming to town.

I was walking down a slope and thinking to myself: How

do the narrators disagree over what light said about a stone?

Is it from a dimly lit stone that wars flare up?

I walk in my sleep. I stare in my sleep. I see

no one behind me. I see no one ahead of me.

All this light is for me. I walk. I become lighter. I fly

then I become another. Transfigured. Words

sprout like grass from Isaiah’s messenger

mouth: “If you don’t believe you won’t be safe.”

I walk as if I were another. And my wound a white

biblical rose. And my hands like two doves

on the cross hovering and carrying the earth. 

I don’t walk, I fly, I become another,

transfigured. No place and no time. So who am I?

I am no I in ascension’s presence. But I

think to myself: Alone, the prophet Muhammad

spoke classical Arabic. “And then what?”

Then what? A woman soldier shouted:

Is that you again? Didn’t I kill you?

I said: You killed me ... and I forgot, like you, to die.

 

Tamara Shannan.jpg

Tamara Shannan

The event was presented by Arabesque events with support from The Mission of the Palestinian State, the Embassies of the Kingdom of Morocco, The Arab Republic of Egypt, The Arab Republic of Sudan, The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.  The event was held in collaboration with the Welcome Café which is funded by the Department of Justice and Equality and Dublin City Council.

World Arabic Day logo.jpg

Ruth Spain, Dima Shannan, Orla TreacColm Brennan_0.jpg